70% of Japanese public satisfied with Abe-Trump talks, poll shows
Japan Times -- Feb 14
Slightly more than 70 percent of Japanese people are satisfied with the recent talks between Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and U.S. President Donald Trump, according to a Kyodo News poll conducted Sunday and Monday.

The poll found that 70.2 percent of respondents reacted positively to the first official talks between Abe and Trump in Washington and Palm Beach, Florida, on Friday and Saturday, while 19.5 percent were dissatisfied.

The support rate for Abe’s Cabinet stood at 61.7 percent in the nationwide survey, up 2.1 points from last month, against a disapproval rate of 27.2 percent.

During their summit, Abe and Trump confirmed plans to strengthen the bilateral alliance and to launch a high-level economic dialogue to cover trade, macroeconomic policy, and infrastructure and energy projects, in a bid to bolster bilateral economic relations.

Trump did not criticize Japan over its sizable trade surplus with the United States, raise currency issues or attack Japan’s automobile trade during the summit in Washington on Friday, Japanese officials said, although prior to the summit he had criticized Tokyo’s economic and monetary policies.

While the Abe-Trump summit drew wide support, the poll found that 75.5 percent of respondents did not understand why Trump issued an executive order to freeze the U.S. refugee program and temporarily bar entry to nationals of seven Muslim-majority countries. Only 16.9 percent said they did.

Abe has been refraining from making comments about Trump’s controversial executive order, saying that a country’s immigration policy is a “domestic matter.”

Over 60 percent of those polled said it was appropriate that Abe played a round of golf with Trump at the president’s Mar-a-Lago vacation estate in Palm Beach where Abe was invited to stay. He stayed there two nights following the summit in Washington.

News source: Japan Times
Sep 21
More than 40 countries have signed a global treaty at UN Headquarters to legally ban nuclear weapons. (NHK)
Sep 21
The 100-day-old baby giant panda at Tokyo's Ueno Zoo can now wobble a few steps by itself, according to pictures and a video released by the zoo on Wednesday. (Jiji)
Sep 21
Emperor Akihito on Wednesday visited a shrine dedicated to ancient Korean settlers in Hidaka, Saitama Prefecture. (Japan Today)
Sep 21
Popular Japanese singer Namie Amuro has announced that she will retire next September. (NHK)
Sep 21
Japan celebrated two years to the start of Rugby World Cup 2019 on Wednesday with the Webb Ellis Cup on display in Tokyo's Shibuya district ahead of a 46-day tour that will see it visit all 12 host cities from Sapporo in the north to Kumamoto in the south. (Japan Today)
Sep 20
Toshiba Corp has decided to sell its chip unit to a Japan-U.S.-South Korean consortium for around 2.4 trillion yen ($21 billion) following months of talks involving other bidders, sources close to the matter said Wednesday. (Japan Today)
Sep 20
Japan logged a customs-cleared trade surplus of 113.6 billion yen in August, compared with 34.6 billion yen in deficit a year before, the Finance Ministry said in a preliminary report Wednesday. (Jiji)
Sep 20
Fukuoka Prefectural Police have arrested a 36-year-old woman in Yukahashi City after she admitted to stabbing her husband, who himself told police his intestines were "coming out" in an emergency call. (tokyoreporter.com)
Sep 20
The estranged wife of a former violin maker broke into his house and destroyed 54 violins and 70 bows after they fought over payments for child support, prosecutors said Tuesday. (Japan Times)
Sep 20
Okinawa police say most of a group of teenagers arrested for vandalizing a site of mass suicide during World War Two say they were playing a prank without knowing the site's historic significance. (NHK)