Kei Komuro: All financial problems resolved
NHK -- Jan 23
Kei Komuro, whose engagement to Japan's Princess Mako is planned, says he understands that all of his mother's financial problems have been resolved.

Princess Mako is the eldest daughter of Prince Akishino and the granddaughter of Emperor Akihito.

Komuro released a public statement for the first time through his lawyers on Tuesday in response to media reports that his mother had financial problems with a former fiance.

Princess Mako and Komuro's planned engagement was announced in September 2017.

However, a weekly magazine and other media reported on the financial problems soon after, and the Imperial Household Agency announced in February 2018 that the string of events leading up to the wedding would be postponed.

In the statement, Komuro said he very much regrets having inconvenienced so many people because he had not given a clear explanation on this issue.

He said his mother had received financial assistance from a man she became engaged to in September 2010.

Komuro said two years later, the man asked that the engagement be called off and his mother expressed her wish to pay him back. He said the man replied that he did not expect the money to be returned.

He explained that his mother and the man had confirmed that all their financial issues were resolved, but about a year later, the man asked for his money back.

Komuro said there have been many media reports saying that debt problems remain, but he and his mother understand that the issue regarding financial assistance from the man has been resolved. Komuro added that he will make an effort to gain the understanding of the former fiance.

Prince Akishino referred to the media reports when he met with reporters in November last year and indicated that Komuro should give an explanation.

Prince Akishino said if the two still wish to get married, then Komuro should respond appropriately.

Sources say Princess Mako and Komuro's wish to get married remains unchanged.

秋篠宮家の長女・眞子さま(27)との婚約が延期となっている小室圭さん(27)が22日、母親の“金銭トラブル”について文書を発表した。
News sources: NHK, ANNnewsCH
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