Diet passes bill to pay Y3.2 million each to victims forcibly sterilized under Japan's eugenics law
Japan Times -- Apr 25
The Diet enacted legislation Wednesday to pay ¥3.2 million in state compensation to each person who underwent forced sterilization under the nation’s now-defunct eugenics law.

The law setting out the compensation provisions, drafted by ruling and opposition parties, offers an apology to survivors, but critics say its wording lacks clarity over where responsibility lies.

Between 1948 and 1996, the Eugenic Protection Law authorized the sterilization of people with intellectual disabilities, mental illness or hereditary disorders to prevent births of “inferior” offspring.

“The government sincerely reflects on and deeply apologizes” for the suffering caused by forced sterilization, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said in a statement. “To never repeat the situation, the government will make utmost efforts to realize a society in which people can coexist, regardless of disease or disability.”

The statement came after the House of Councilors unanimously approved the bill on Wednesday, following its passage through the House of Representatives on April 11.

The lump-sum payment marks a significant step forward for survivors but some are critical, noting that it has taken more than two decades since the practice ended for the government to act. Some are determined to continue court cases and are suing the government for greater compensation, the highest demand exceeding ¥30 million.

優生保護法のもとで強制的に不妊手術を受けさせられた人たちを救済する法律が参議院本会議で可決・成立しました。 全会一致で可決・成立した救済法には「我々は、それぞれの立場において真摯に反省し、心から深くおわびする」と被害者へのおわびが記されています。

News sources: Japan Times, ANNnewsCH
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