Flight data recorder from Japan's crashed F-35A retrieved, but key data still missing
Japan Times -- May 08
The Defense Ministry has retrieved part of the flight data recorder from a F-35A stealth fighter that went missing last month, but it was heavily damaged and also did not include a storage device to record speed and altitude data, Defense Minister Takeshi Iwaya told reporters Tuesday.

The discovery on the sea floor, the exact location of which has been withheld for security reasons, is therefore unlikely to help determine the cause of the crash.

What looked like some parts of the stealth fighter — which cost more than ¥10 billion — were also spotted on the sea floor, about 1,500 meters below the surface. The Defense Ministry plans to salvage them, said a public relations officer with the Air Self-Defense Force in Tokyo.

The F-35A stealth fighter went missing on April 9 about 135 kilometers east of Misawa Air Base in Aomori Prefecture, during a combat exercise together with other three F-35As.

The pilot, Maj. Akinori Hosomi, has yet to be found.

The crash of the F-35A, which was made by U.S. firm Lockheed Martin and assembled by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. Ltd., is believed to have been the first in the world for that particular model, drawing much attention from military analysts around the world as a result.

岩屋防衛大臣は先月9日に墜落した航空自衛隊のステルス戦闘機F35Aの事故に関し、現場付近の海底でフライトレコーダーの一部を発見したことを明らかにしました。 岩屋防衛大臣:「(フライトレコーダーの)全部が発見されているわけではありませんので、かなりだから損傷が激しいのかなと。
News sources: Japan Times, ANNnewsCH
May 29
NHK has learned that Tokyo Tower will reopen from Thursday, although most visitors will have to take the stairs instead of elevators to access the observation deck. (NHK)
May 28
Japan's Diet has enacted legislation to tighten regulations on IT giants by requiring them to ensure transparency of their online business transactions with their business partners. (NHK)
May 27
Japan is slowly bringing its economy back on line as a state of emergency was fully lifted after almost two months. While many in Tokyo seemed eager to reclaim a sense of normalcy, steps to keep the coronavirus at bay mean it's far from business as usual. (NHK)
May 27
The lifting of the state of emergency in Tokyo saw many people resuming their daily commutes by train on Tuesday. With stations bustling, the city seemed almost normal. (Nikkei)
May 27
Amusement park association wants quiet thrill rides, no hugs as part of post-coronavirus closure reopenings. (soranews24.com)
May 26
Tokyo Metropolitan Police arrested a man after allegedly trespassed onto the grounds of the Imperial Palace on Monday, reports Jiji Press (May 25). (tokyoreporter.com)
May 26
A retired racehorse has escaped from a racetrack in Tokyo and was hit by a vehicle while running through a nearby intersection. (NHK)
May 25
Police in Kumamoto City have arrested three youths — two aged 19 and one aged 18 — on suspicion of attempted murder after they threw concrete blocks from a bridge at trucks on an expressway below. (Japan Today)
May 25
The local government in the city of Toyohashi, Aichi Prefecture, has announced that a person who traveled from the Philippines had developed rabies — the first case in Japan in 14 years. (Japan Times)
May 22
The head of the Tokyo High Public Prosecutor's Office, who has been the focus of intense scrutiny over his close relationship with the administration of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, submitted his resignation Thursday following a report that he had participated in a game of mahjong while gambling with newspaper employees. (Japan Times)