Man listed as likely abducted by North Korea found dead in Japan
tokyoreporter.com -- Sep 08
A man who was considered abducted by North Korea has been confirmed dead in Japan, police said on Friday, reports TV Asahi (Sept. 7).

According to police, Takeshi Saito went missing after resigning from his company in Yokohama City, Kanagawa Prefecture in October, 1983 at age of 38.

In April of last year, the body of Saito, a native of Sakata City, Yamagata, was discovered at an unspecified location in Japan.

No details of the circumstances of the discovery were provided. However, he was not involved in a crime and his disappearance was not connected to North Korea, police said.

According to the National Police Agency, a total of 880 missing Japanese nationals are believed to have been abducted by North Korea.

The NPA web site includes the names, photographs and backgrounds of some of the missing persons.

Saito is the third such person to be located in Japan this year. Earlier this month, a man who went missing in 1974 was confirmed safe. In May, police revealed that another man from Chiba Prefecture was found safe.

拉致の可能性がある「特定失踪者」に認定されていた山形県出身の男性が遺体で見つかりました。警察は北朝鮮による拉致の可能性はなかったとしています。 山形県酒田市出身の斎藤武さん(当時38)は1983年10月下旬、当時勤めていた横浜市の会社を退職した後に行方不明となり、民間の「特定失踪者問題調査会」が斎藤さんを北朝鮮に拉致された可能性がある特定失踪者に認定していました。警察によりますと、去年4月、日本国内で発見された遺体が斎藤さん本人だと確認されたということです。詳しい発見場所や遺体の状況などは明らかにしていませんが、遺体には犯罪に巻き込まれたような形跡はなく、拉致の可能性はなかったということです。
News sources: tokyoreporter.com, ANNnewsCH
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