Rugby: Brave Blossoms dedicate win to typhoon victims
Kyodo -- Oct 14
Japan captain Michael Leitch said Sunday's historic win over Scotland at the Rugby World Cup was the Brave Blossoms' way of helping the nation in the aftermath of Typhoon Hagibis and thanking those that helped put the game on.

"Before the match started, at the team hotel, the players already knew how this game was more than just us, that a lot of people suffered in the typhoon," he said following the 28-21 win in Yokohama that sees Japan make the quarterfinals for the first time.

"A lot of people did a lot of hard work to make this game happen. There were guys up late last night with sponges. We are grateful for the opportunity to inspire Japan and we showed that for 80 minutes tonight."

Man-of-the-match Kenki Fukuoka also praised those that had helped put the game on.

"A lot of people made efforts to realize this match today,” he said. "I first of all want to thank them and to repay them I was determined to produce a result that would be an empowerment to the Japanese people."

(Japan players observe a moment of silence ahead of a Rugby World Cup Pool A match against Scotland in Yokohama, near Tokyo, on Oct. 13, 2019, in memory of the victims of Typhoon Hagibis that ripped through wide areas of Japan the previous day.)

Sunday's game at International Stadium Yokohama (Nissan Stadium) only got the go-ahead at 10:30 a.m. following a detailed inspection and discussions with local authorities. Typhoon Hagibis left at least 35 dead and nearly 20 others missing.

News source: Kyodo
May 30
Tokyo Gov. Yuriko Koike announced Friday that phase two of the capital’s three-part plan to peel back coronavirus countermeasures will begin on Monday. (Japan Times)
May 30
The city of Kitakyushu in Japan's southwest said Friday it has been hit by a second wave of coronavirus infections following a recent surge in the number of new cases. (Japan Today)
May 30
The number of foreigners staying in Japan under a new visa for workers with specified skills totaled 3,987 as of the end of March, less than a tenth of the maximum set by the government in the first year of its introduction, immigration authorities said Friday. (Kyodo)
May 30
Despite Nissan Motor Co.’s latest efforts to become more cost-efficient and profitable by strengthening its collaboration with Renault SA, its business downturn may be causing a costly delay in the global race toward new mobility technologies, analysts say. (Japan Times)
May 30
The countdown is on for one of the most prestigious horse races in Japan, as the clock ticks down to 3:40 p.m. on Sunday, when the Japanese Derby will be run. (Japan Times)
May 30
The operator of Tokyo Skytree, a popular tourist destination in the Japanese capital, said Friday it will reopen the landmark tower on Monday after a three-month closure due to the spread of coronavirus infections. (Kyodo)
May 30
The Air Self-Defense Force’s Blue Impulse acrobatics team on Friday performed a flyover over central Tokyo in a show of respect to doctors and medical staff who have been at the forefront of the battle against the coronavirus pandemic. (Japan Times)
May 29
Restrictions to contain the coronavirus are slowly being eased in Japan and life is starting to get back to normal. But the mayor of Kitakyushu City in southwestern Japan says COVID-19 cases are on the rise again. (NHK)
May 29
At the beginning of April, a young sumo wrestler known as Shobushi came down with a fever. His coaches tried calling a local public health center to get him a coronavirus test, but the phone lines were busy. (Japan Times)
May 29
One of three persons who died in a shooting at a residence in the town of Sakaki on Tuesday was a member of a criminal syndicate, police have revealed, reports Fuji News Network (May 28). (tokyoreporter.com)