Nearly 14 million computers in Japan at risk as Microsoft ends Windows 7 support
Japan Times -- Jan 15
Microsoft Corp. stops providing free support for the Windows 7 operating system Tuesday, and warned that an estimated 13.9 million computers in Japan still using the system could become more vulnerable to viruses and hacking.

According to Microsoft’s Japan unit, an estimated 7.53 million computers in Japanese offices and local government facilities and 6.38 million in households are still using Windows 7, comprising around 20 percent of all active Windows computers in the country.

With the end of support, users need to upgrade to Windows 10 or other operating systems. They should also consider buying new computers as older machines may not be compatible with the newer software, the company said.

Microsoft has provided free updates for Windows 7 users to fix security bugs regularly, around once a month, but these services will end by 11:59 p.m. Tuesday.

It said more than 9 million computers are expected to still be running Windows 7 as of July when the Tokyo Olympics get underway.

“The Tokyo Olympics will increase global attention and make (Japan) susceptible to cyberattacks,” a company official warned.

Ritsumeikan University professor Tetsutaro Uehara, an expert on cybersecurity, noted that computers infected with a virus are vulnerable to being “hacked and misused for cyberattacks.”

Some information security firms such as Trend Micro Inc. will for the time being continue to offer services to protect Windows 7 users who need time to upgrade to a new operating system but said they may not be able to fully prevent a computer virus infection.

News source: Japan Times
Aug 15
Japan will mark the 75th anniversary of its World War Two surrender on Saturday in a memorial ceremony scaled back because of the COVID-19 pandemic, as ties with neighbors China and South Korea remain haunted by the conflict's legacy. (Japan Today)
Aug 15
The Tokyo Metropolitan Government said Friday that it will inspect bars and restaurants with a metropolitan government-issued sticker indicating that adequate measures to prevent COVID-19 infections are in place. (Japan Times)
Aug 15
Japan’s two major air carriers will substantially reduce their domestic flights next month due to weak demand amid a resurgence of novel coronavirus infections. (Japan Times)
Aug 15
Japanese couple Rikiya and Ayumi Kataoka had their honeymoon wrecked by the coronavirus pandemic, but their resourcefulness in enforced exile in Cape Verde has won them appointments as ambassadors for its Olympic team. (Japan Today)
Aug 15
Japan and Malaysia agreed Friday they may ease coronavirus-related travel restrictions for expatriates in early September, if they take precautionary measures such as a 14-day self-quarantine period after entering their respective countries, the Japanese Foreign Ministry said. (Japan Times)
Aug 14
The Tokyo Metropolitan Government says it confirmed 389 new cases of the coronavirus on Friday. (NHK)
Aug 14
Thursday marks the start of the Bon holidays in Japan, when Buddhists honor the spirits of their ancestors. (NHK)
Aug 14
With people think of a Japanese city with a rich cultural legacy, Kyoto is the first place that springs to mind, but Osaka is no slouch in the historical significance department either. (soranews24.com)
Aug 13
The central government and Hiroshima local governments appealed Wednesday a landmark ruling last month by the Hiroshima District Court that had recognized more victims of radioactive “black rain,” caused by fallout from the atomic bombing of the city, as eligible for support. (Japan Times)
Aug 13
An assistant police inspector in Komaki, Aichi Prefecture, has been arrested on suspicion of assaulting a male movie-goer at a theater. (Japan Today)