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Nature
Nature
Nature is the international weekly journal of science: a magazine style journal that publishes full-length research papers in all disciplines of science, as well as News and Views, reviews, news, features, commentaries, web focuses and more, covering all branches of science and how science impacts upon all aspects of society and life.
22 Oct
After three years of heated debate, the advocates and critics of gain-of-function research must work to agree on how best to regulate the work.
22 Oct
Social-media fun for medical research bypasses animal sensitivities.
21 Oct
Europe must act to stop livestock drugs from wiping out its vulture populations.
21 Oct
The closure of a 40-year project to understand and protect seabirds shows the false priorities of funders, warns Tim Birkhead.
22 Oct
Explosions of plasma in the Sun's atmosphere can reach temperatures of nearly 100,000 °C, much hotter than scientists had expected.The finding is one of several about the region between the solar surface and the uppermost edge of the Sun's atmosphere, or corona, revealed by
22 Oct
Disrupted sleep patterns alter the composition of gut bacteria, leading to metabolic problems.Eran Elinav at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, and his team found that the abundance of gut microbes in mice fluctuates daily in sync with host feeding times. But
22 Oct
Wild southern white rhinoceroses could go extinct in just nine years because of poaching, but could be saved if trade in their horns were to be carefully managed.Poachers killed almost 1,000 southern white rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum simum; pictured) for their horns
22 Oct
Implanted retinal cells derived from stem cells seem to be improving vision in some people in two early-stage clinical trials.Steven Schwartz at the University of California, Los Angeles, Robert Lanza at Advanced Cell Technology in Marlborough, Massachusetts, and their team grew retinal pigmented epithelial
22 Oct
A laser beam can move matter tens of centimetres and in two directions.Such tractor beams have been used to shift small objects very short distances. To scale this up, Wieslaw Krolikowski at the Australian National University in Canberra and his team fired a laser
22 Oct
Tornadoes in the United States have been happening on fewer days since the 1970s, but more tornadoes have touched down (pictured) on those days.The overall number of US tornadoes has not changed in recent decades. However, in analysing the national tornado database,
22 Oct
Blocking a brain-cell receptor boosts the brain's ability to form new neuronal connections as it adapts to changing stimuli.Carla Shatz at Stanford University in California and her colleagues disrupted the receptor, PirB, in the visual centre of mouse brains by either genetically deleting it
22 Oct
Bizarre 500-million-year-old sea creatures called vetulicolians are relatives of vertebrates.Palaeontologists have struggled to identify the relationship between living animals and these extinct organisms, because of their odd combination of features such as gill slits and a segmented abdomen. A team led by Diego García-Bellido
22 Oct
Engineering certain immune cells to kill cancerous cells in leukaemia has driven the disease into remission for up to two years in more than half of participants in an early-stage clinical trial.Stephan Grupp at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and his co-workers tested
22 Oct
Amid increased competition for faculty jobs in biomedicine, some have suggested cutting the number of PhD students. So when a senior scientist advised against this, the online world took notice. Eve Marder, a neuroscientist at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, argued in the journal eLife
22 Oct
The week in science: Snail discovery revives publishing spat; proposed nuclear-waste site passes key US safety evaluation; and biopharmaceutical firm AbbVie cools on US$54-billion takeover deal.
22 Oct
Government to cease funding gain-of-function studies that make viruses more dangerous, pending a safety assessment.
21 Oct
November vote is unlikely to break a political stalemate that has squeezed research funding.
22 Oct
DNA shows a group of modern humans roamed across Asia.
21 Oct
Space telescope beats mechanical failures to begin a second mission that will trace new celestial targets.
22 Oct
Hybrid methods to solve structures of molecular machines create a storage headache.
21 Oct
Bioethicists are setting up consultancies for research — but some scientists question whether they are needed.
In 2004, researchers announced the discovery of Homo floresiensis, a small relative of modern humans that lived as recently as 18,000 years ago. The ‘hobbit’ is now considered the most important hominin fossil in a generation. Here, the scientists behind the find tell its story.
Ten years after the publication of a remarkable find, Chris Stringer explains why the discovery of Homo floresiensis is still so challenging.
Scenario-based training for disasters is better than just drawing up a paper plan, say Jennifer K. Pullium and colleagues.
22 Oct
Richard Holmes finds Mary Somerville's breakthrough science best-seller thrillingly fresh, 180 years on.
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