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Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones.

You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

Embassy of the United Arab Emirates

Arabic/Japanese/English Interpreter Translator

  • Company: Embassy of the United Arab Emirates
  • Salary: ¥590,000 ~ ¥700,000 / Month (Negotiable)
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Fluent
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

The Embassy of the United Arab Emirates is seeking a new interpreter and translator.

Your main duty will include translating, editing and revising letters, reports, documents, texts, news articles, studies and presentations from English and Japanese into Arabic and vice versa.

Fluency in English, Arabic and Japanese is preferred.

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Abracadabra

Japanese to English Translator/Editor

  • Company: Abracadabra
  • Salary: ¥250,000 ~ ¥350,000 / Month (Negotiable)
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

As a Japanese to English translator/editor, your duty will include proofreading localization of Japanese websites, social media and smartphone apps and copywriting for different IT-related products.

You must have at least two years of experience in a similar role.

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CardealPage

Overseas Sales Staff

  • Company: CardealPage
  • Salary: ¥240,000 ~ ¥500,000 / Month (Negotiable)
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

CardealPage is looking for an overseas sales staff to sell used cars to overseas clients.

Additional language abilities such as Portuguese, French and Swahili are preferred.

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<a target=_blank oo-button="primary outline" href="https://jobs.gaijinpot.com/job/view/lang/en/job_id/142166?utm_source=blog.gaijinpot.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=job" itemprop="url" …continue reading

    

For many native or near-native English speakers, working as an assistant language teacher (ALT) is one of the most popular ways to get a taste of life in Japan. Positions are available across the country, numerous companies can sponsor visas, and generally no Japanese ability is required. However, before booking a flight or moving homes, it’s necessary to dazzle at the all-important interview. If you’re looking to move to Japan or simply change employers, use these 5 tips to increase your chances of getting hired for an ALT position.

1. Dress Professionally

Or, put another way, be sure to follow the Japanese office dress-code. While many offices outside of Japan may be flexible and provide more opportunities for self-expression through fashion choices, Japanese work environments prefer a more standardized approach:

Men are expected to show up to interviews, in person or online, in a pressed and fitted suit with a neutral patterned tie. Facial hair can be considered unprofessional in Japan, but should be acceptable as long as it is closely trimmed with clear boundaries. Be aware that long hair on men is rarely acceptable, with some companies offering a position contingent on agreeing to a shorter hair style.

Women should wear a neutral colored blazer, skirt, and pressed dress shirt. Dyed hair is acceptable for anyone as long as it is a natural shade. Additionally, tattoos should be fully covered, jewelry kept to a bare minimum, and strong perfume or cologne should be avoided. By following the standard dress-code prior to being briefed will indicate to the company that the applicant can easily blend into a Japanese work environment.

2. Listen Well

If you’ve made it to the interview stage, it is likely that your chances of being accepted into the company are good. This means that the school has almost enough information …continue reading

    

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones.

You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

Embassy of the United Arab Emirates

Arabic/Japanese/English Interpreter Translator

  • Company: Embassy of the United Arab Emirates
  • Salary: ¥590,000 ~ ¥700,000 / Month Negotiable
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Fluent
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

The embassy of United Arab Emirates is seeking a new interpreter and translator.

Your main duty will include translate, edit and revise letters, reports, documents, texts, news articles, studies and presentations from English and Japanese language into Arabic and vice versa.

Fluency in English, Arabic and Japanese is preferred.

Share this Job

Apply Here

Abracadabra

Japanese to English Translator/Editor

  • Company: Abracadabra
  • Salary: ¥250,000 ~ ¥350,000 / Month Negotiable
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

As a Japanese to English translator/editor your duty will include proofreading localization of Japanese websites, social media and smartphone apps, and copywriting for different IT-related products.

You must have at least two years in a similar role.

Share this Job

Apply Here

CardealPage

Overseas Sales Staff

  • Company: CardealPage
  • Salary: ¥240,000 ~ ¥500,000 / Month Negotiable
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

CardealPage is looking for an overseas sales staff to sell used cars to overseas clients.

Additional language abilities such as Portuguese, French and Swahili are preferred.

Share this Job

Apply …continue reading

    

Working in Japan can be a new and exciting experience. But adjusting to a different country’s work style can also be a challenge! You may face difficulties you have never encountered in your previous country. Why does my co-worker never talk to me? Did I do something wrong? Why are my ideas being ignored?

Here we discuss some common issues you may face with Japanese co-workers and how you can resolve them!

Common problems with foreign workers

You may have noticed that some of your bosses or co-workers seem to resent working with international people. A recent study by employment agency, Persol Group, highlighted the top complaints Japanese mangers have with foreign workers:

  • Foreign workers are too assertive
  • They demand salary raises
  • They have little loyalty to the company
  • The learning curve for their position is long and slow

Communication barriers

If you came to Japan to improve your language skill, you may be keen to practice with your co-workers. But bear in mind even if you are an advanced learner, things may still be lost in translation.

If your co-workers are English speakers, try double-checking in both Japanese and English to ensure understanding. If you are doubtful that the message is coming across, take the time to be very, very clear. Mistakes are forgiven in Japanese companies, but it will take a while before they fully trust you again.

However, that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t try to talk in Japanese! Many Japanese people are nervous about speaking in English. They are afraid of making mistakes and embarrassing themselves. But, if you demonstrate that you are willing to make errors in Japanese, they will be more comfortable talking to you in English. Even if you are not an advanced speaker, your Japanese coworkers will appreciate your effort.

Cultural miscommunication

Japanese workers prefer to avoid conflict. That’s why Japanese people …continue reading

    

“Keigo” – it’s the single most terrifying word to Japanese language students (after “kanji,” of course). Put simply, keigo (敬語(けいご)) is a speech style that shows deference to those of higher status. It’s a rather complex but somewhat formulaic system; while it is at first daunting, it is likely that learners will hear and pick up on many key phrases simply through exposure to Japanese work environments. Most Japanese co-workers will not expect their foreign counterparts to know the ins and outs of keigo, especially since many Japanese study it themselves. However, properly using keigo will undoubtedly soften your speech and be appreciated by others.

Here are five essential phrases to politely communicate at work:

1.「恐(おそ)れ入(い)りますが」“My apologies, but…”

This is technically a kenjō phrase, meaning it indicates your low status in comparison to the listener, and can be used to soften a request. Often, the following request may take time, effort, or consideration to be completed. Opening your request with a line such as osore-irimasuga acknowledges the trouble the other must go through, and the speaker’s appreciation. This phrase should come in handy especially when starting a new job, where reports and projects may require approval by your superiors.

「恐(おそ)れ入(い)りますが、表(ひょう)の数字(すうじ)をご確認(かくにん)いただけますか?」 = “I’m sorry to take up your time, but could you check the numbers on the chart for me?”

2.「都合(つごう)がつかないため」 “I’m not available”

Textbooks often teach students 「都合(つごう)が悪(わる)い」 or the simple 「ちょっと…」 to indicate that a proposed time doesn’t work. While both options can be used quite liberally across different situations, switching out 悪(わる)い (literally “bad”) for つかない elevates the expression. Because of the addition of ため at the end, meaning “because,” a suggestion for another time or date would be expected.

「都合(つごう)がつかないため別日(べつび)でお願(ねが)いします」 = “Because I’m not available (at that time), let’s find another day.”

3.「時間的(じかんてき)な余裕(よゆう)がないため」 “I don’t have time to spare”

Though the English translation of this …continue reading

    

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones.

You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

netwise

Marketing Planner

  • Company: netwise
  • Salary: ¥4.2M ~ ¥5.4M / Year
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Fluent
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Marketing planners create, launch, and manage digital media campaigns. You will direct the activities of designers, marketing specialists, and developers with the goal of meeting client targets and objectives.

You should have a good basic knowledge of digital marketing and be able to work with your team to translate a client’s business objectives into a digital strategy.

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Wayfarer

Operations Associates

  • Company: Wayfarer
  • Salary: ¥210,000 ~ ¥230,000 / Month (Negotiable)
  • Location: Kyoto, Japan
  • English: Fluent
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Wayfarer Hospitality is looking for operations associates to join its facility in Kyoto.

Your primary duty will be to assist in managing end-to-end traveler services across multiple Wayfarer accommodation projects, including reservations and inquiries operations, front desk routines (check-in/ out, lobby cleaning, housekeeping management, inventory/amenity management) and group booking sourcing and sales.

You must be fluent in both English and Japanese.

Share this Job

Apply Here

Azabu Skin Clinic

Beauty Clinic Receptionist and Sales Representative

  • Company: Azabu Skin Clinic
  • Salary: ¥250,000 / Month (Negotiable + Incentives)
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Basic
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Azabu Skin Clinic is looking for a highly enthusiastic bilingual staff capable of doing receptionist work, …continue reading

    

Unlike other countries like Singapore, where bicycles don’t need to be registered, owning a bike in Japan entails a far more detailed process than just paying the amount shown on the price tag.

Who can own bicycles in Japan?

As long as you have a registered address in Japan or a zairyu card (residence card), even if temporary or for a short-stay period, you can own a bike. Upon purchasing a new or used bike, you will need these for documentation or registration purposes. Other than those things, you’re good to go in accessing this essential transportation method. You can also opt for an even more temporary bike through rental services, which will be discussed later.

How and where to buy a bike in Japan

Buying a brand new bicycle in Japan is pretty straightforward if you get it from a shop. You pick out the bike that you want and inform the staff of your intent to purchase. They will also recommend the best bicycle for your height and riding lifestyle (whether for daily commute or off-road trekking).

You often have to present an ID and fill out a registration form called jitensha bouhan touroku. The registration form is submitted to the police for filing by the bike shop on your behalf. The staff gives you the original copy of the bike’s ownership form, a yellow sticker of registration which you put on the bike frame, the keys to the lock, and other forms such as discount coupons for future maintenance services. It costs about ¥500 to register a bicycle through a shop.

Your other option is to purchase one online from Amazon or Rakuten. This method is more convenient wherein you don’t need to browse and fill up forms, although you will still need to register your bike at the nearby …continue reading

    

Looking to rent an apartment in Japan? If you have already started, you know how tough the process can be! Renting in Japan can be a complicated experience, especially for foreigners. Be prepared to wade through a lot of red tape!

One of the most confusing parts of renting in Japan is the need for a guarantor. What is a guarantor? How do I find one? Here we list all you need to know to about rental guarantors in Japan to secure the apartment you want.

What is Rental Guarantor?

A guarantor is a person who can cover the cost for you if you cannot pay your rent or damage fines. However, the recently revised Civil Code does allow a limited Guarantee Amount (the maximum amount the guarantor must pay).

Please note that a ‘guarantor’ and ‘joint guarantor’ have slightly different meanings. A guarantor may request the tenant to pay their unpaid rent. A joint guarantor (連帯保証人(れんたいほしょうじん), or ‘rentai hoshounin’) is legally responsible if the tenant doesn’t pay for rent or damages.

In Japan, a co-signor or guarantor is called a ‘hoshonin’ (保証(ほしょう)). As this person is agreeing to fulfil your financial debts, they must prove they have the financial means to pay. Most Japanese people ask a parent or close family member to be their guarantor.

Who can be a Rental Guarantor?

For foreigners who are new to Japan, finding a guarantor can be difficult. Many landlords or management companies have the following requirements for a guarantor:

  • A Japanese national
  • Someone who works full-time, with proven evidence of a stable income
  • Someone under the age of 65

This is so they can ensure that the guarantor can pay and (hopefully) will not pass away before the rent is due!

So, what do you do if you can’t find such a person?

What if I can’t find a guarantor in Japan?

Luckily, …continue reading

    

This new dentist wants to make otaku dreams come true.

Tokyo’s Akihabara, or “Akiba” as it’s affectionately known in otaku circles, has long been known as a place where moe, feelings of strong affection towards 2-D characters in media like anime and manga, isn’t just accepted but encouraged and celebrated.

The warm and fuzzy world of moe is laden with cuteness and a sense of comfort, and it’s the central concept that maid cafes in the area have built their successes on. Now, the concept of maids and moe is being used to provide comfort to another type of clientele in a slightly more nerve-wracking environment — the dentist’s office.

▼ That’s right – a moe dentist is opening up in Akihabara.

This unusual dentist’s office goes by the name “Akiba Shika” (“Akiba Dentistry”) in Japanese and “Akiba Dental Clinic” in English. Unlike other dental clinics, this one has a hygienist who’s dressed as a maid, and to get everyone acquainted with the unusual concept, a preview event was held for the public on 10-12 June, ahead of the clinic’s official July opening.

Our reporter Seiji Nakazawa stopped by to see what it was all about, and when he arrived, the first thing that impressed him was the beauty of the reception area, which was clean, modern, calm, and inviting.

▼ Then he stepped into the dentist’s room, and that’s where he got his first glimpse of moe at the dentist.

<img src="https://soranews24.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2022/06/Akihabara-dentist-maid-moe-Akiba-dental-otaku-unusual-cosplay-assistant-Tokyo-Japanese-new-review-photos-3.jpg?w=640" alt="" width="640" height="542" srcset="https://soranews24.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2022/06/Akihabara-dentist-maid-moe-Akiba-dental-otaku-unusual-cosplay-assistant-Tokyo-Japanese-new-review-photos-3.jpg 1300w, https://soranews24.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2022/06/Akihabara-dentist-maid-moe-Akiba-dental-otaku-unusual-cosplay-assistant-Tokyo-Japanese-new-review-photos-3.jpg?resize=150,127 …continue reading

    

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones.

You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

Wayfarer

Operations Associates

  • Company: Wayfarer
  • Salary: ¥210,000 ~ ¥230,000 / Month (Negotiable)
  • Location: Kyoto, Japan
  • English: Fluent
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Wayfarer Hospitality is looking for operations associates to join its facility in Kyoto.

Your primary duty will be to assist in managing end-to-end traveler services across multiple Wayfarer accommodation projects, including reservations and inquiries operations, front desk routines (check-in/ out, lobby cleaning, housekeeping management, inventory/amenity management) and group booking sourcing and sales.

You must be fluent in both English and Japanese.

Share this Job

Apply Here

Azabu Skin Clinic

Beauty Clinic Receptionist and Sales Representative

  • Company: Azabu Skin Clinic
  • Salary: ¥250,000 / Month (Negotiable + Incentives)
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Basic
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Azabu Skin Clinic is looking for a highly enthusiastic bilingual staff capable of doing receptionist work, sales, counseling and translation, mainly corresponding and attending to foreigners in English.

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Apply Here

Daito Kentaku Leasing Co.

Real-Estate Support Services

  • Company: Daito Kentaku Leasing Co.
  • Salary: ¥1,500 / Hour
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Business level
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

A major real-estate agency in Japan is looking for a part-time translator to translate requests in English or Vietnamese from their stores around Japan.

You must be willing to work on Saturday and Sunday, with …continue reading