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Source: Gaijin Pot

When searching for an apartment in Tokyo, your closest train line is essential. It’s a central component of your Tokyo experience, influencing everything from your usual hangout spots to where you buy your groceries. Moreover, your choice of station shapes how you think and feel about life in Tokyo, so it’s crucial to get it right. This series gives you an overview of some of Tokyo’s best train lines to live on.

Let’s delve into the line that’s made for city living: the Tokyo Metro Marunouchi line.

Overview

Photo: iStock: Torjrtrx
Tokyo station on the Marunouchi is an architectural icon.

The Tokyo Metro Marunouchi line (丸ノ内線, Marunouchi-sen) opened its doors in 1954 as the first Tokyo subway line built since the Second World War, making it the second-oldest after the Ginza line in 1927. Its name, meaning “within the circle,” refers to the moat that encircles Tokyo’s Imperial Palace.

Its lopsided U-shaped trajectory heads east from Ikebukuro station before swinging west towards its final destinations, Ogikubo and Honancho (via a branch line) in Suginami ward. All stations fall within the city’s border, and there are no direct connections to other lines, making it one of the shortest lines in Tokyo.

What the Marunouchi lacks in length, it makes up for with convenience.

However, what the Marunouchi lacks in coverage, it makes up for with convenience. Sixteen of its twenty-eight stations provide barrier-free switches to numerous JR and subway trains, including the Fukutoshin line at Shinjuku-sanchome and a same-platform transfer to the Ginza line at Akasaka-mitsuke. Not to mention, it stops at the most important transport hubs in the city for those journeying further afield: Shinjuku, Ikebukuro …continue reading

    

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones.

You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

Office of Science and Innovation, Embassy of Sweden

Science and Innovation Adviser

  • Company: Office of Science and Innovation, Embassy of Sweden
  • Salary: Amount not specified
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Business level
  • Application: Overseas applications OK

The Embassy of Sweden is looking for an Adviser to promote and deliver collaboration between Sweden and Japan in innovation, science and higher education. Mainly, addressing joint societal challenges in fields related to climate, digitalization and health are of relevance.

You must be fluent (spoken and written) in English and Japanese.

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Mahou no Hoikuen (株式会社HIROLINE)

Full-time Pre-School English instructor

  • Company: Mahou no Hoikuen (株式会社HIROLINE)
  • Salary: ¥280,000 ~ ¥300,000 / Month, Negotiable (depending on experience)
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Business level
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Mahou no Hoikuen is looking for a creative, energetic and caring teacher to join bright and friendly pre-school in Shinagawa.

You will teach children between zero and six years old from 15 minutes to 30 minutes long, two to three times a day.

Previous Experience teaching English to children at an international school or English conversation school is preferred.

Benefits include a very competitive salary, transportation fees allowance, social and health insurance and bonuses twice a year.

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Citrin Foundation Ltd.

Clinical Development Director


Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones.

You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

Full & Part-Time Warehouse/Agriculture Worker

  • Company: Creo Union Global Department Faros
  • Salary: ¥950 ~ ¥1,100 / Hour
  • Location: Hokkaido, Japan
  • English: Conversational
  • Japanese: Basic
  • Application: Overseas applications OK

Creo Union Global Department Faros is for warehouse and agriculture workers for a farm in Hokkaido.

Your main duty will be to gather, prepare and send off agricultural products.

Housing support is provided if requested.

Share this Job

Apply Here

Career Scout Japan

Recruiting Consultant

  • Company: Career Scout Japan
  • Salary: ¥3.6M ~ ¥10.0M / Year, Negotiable, Commission Based
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Fluent
  • Japanese: Conversational
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Career Scout Japan is seeking to recruit consultants with excellent communication and presentation skills to join its team.

Your main duties will be to develop and maintain existing clients, source/meet/evaluate potential candidates, and follow up with clients on the candidates’ introduction to facilitate their hiring process.

A 3-month full training is provided.

You must have a customer service-oriented mindset.

Share this Job

Apply Here

Berlitz Japan, Inc. (ベルリッツ・ジャパン株式会社)

English Instructors (Tokyo & Yokohama Areas)

  • Company: Berlitz Japan, Inc. (ベルリッツ・ジャパン株式会社)
  • Salary: ¥125,000 / Month
  • Location: Kanto, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Business level
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Berlitz is looking for English Instructors in the Tokyo and Yokohama area.

Any applicants who completed 12 years of education from countries with English as an official language are welcomed to apply.

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Coming from the countryside of UK, I remember the look that I got from people when I told them that I lived in a マンション (Manshon). In the UK, mansions are huge impressive buildings with acres of land and butlers with names like Jeeves. I imagine that it brought up images of me in some posh part of Japan sipping champagne near my private pool and tennis court.

English Mansion

Of course, the reality couldn’t be further from that. マンション may be similar size in terms of the amount of material used to build it, but a マンション in Japan is built upwards instead of horizontally. マンション are generally at least 3-floors high and can go as high as the builder wants.

Japanese Mansion

The big Japanese cities have plenty of them that are over 10 floors high, which are called タワーマンション. As most Japanese people have a good image of people living in these タワーマンション, many companies intentionally build 12-floor buildings to make their projects as tempting as possible.

On the other hand, there are apartments (アパート), which are generally built low to the ground. It is unusual to find one that is more than 2-3 floors high. While these lack the prestige of タワーマンション or even マンション, they are often a lot cheaper, as Japanese people generally view living on the lower floors of アパート and even マンション as a little uncool.

Japanese Apartment

Materials make the difference

While it is often not something that foreign people think about when they look for a place to …continue reading

    

Source: Gaijin Pot

We hear some of you are looking to transition away from teaching as of late. This last year has certainly been a doozy, for sure, making job and income security a bit more harried than it is on a good day.

So for this month’s list, we’ve packed in a bit of diversity—in both location and with the jobs themselves. Have a look and good luck to you as always!

1. Pastry chef

Are you the sort of person who knows precisely why a Mont Blanc has codineige (non-melting sugar for pastry toppings) atop its mountainous layers of chestnut? Do you dream of baking in Hokkaido?

If you answered “yes” and find yourself more in tune with the cool rhythm of the pastry kitchen instead of the heat of the line, you’ll do well to check out this cool part-time opportunity with Sheraton Hotels, Kiroro Resort in Hokkaido.

You’ll be working in tandem with the senior pastry chef and the rest of the kitchen brigade at one of Hokkaido’s premier ski resort properties to help deliver first class service, a favorable impression guests won’t be able to deny, and food they will remember.

Pastry chefs, of course, are a calm bunch with exceptional attention to detail, buy they also like to have fun—especially with all that gorgeous powder around. A competitive salary for this winter season opportunity, staff discounts on food and accommodation, and free skiing are just a few of the benefits of applying now.

Applicants are required to have the eligibility to live and work in Japan, and documentation will be required at the interview stage. This is a perfect opportunity to experience Japan in the winter, so if you’re already in Hokkaido, or have free time to spend there this winter, I would definitely apply. In fact, I just might …continue reading

    

It’s no secret that English teaching jobs in Japan are always in high demand, from the need for English teachers at public high school, to evening English tutoring with Japanese businessmen. While some people come to Japan and actually aspire to be teachers or professors, teaching English is not the only career option you have here.

There are actually many non-teaching job opportunities in Japan that are perfect for career-seekers with English or foreign language skills and a drive to work in the land of the rising sun. Below are five examples of what you can do besides teaching English in Japan.

1. Translation and Interpretation

If you have an excellent command of Japanese and a passion for written and verbal communication between different cultures and languages, you may be considering a job in translation or interpretation.

If you are looking to make this your career in Japan, you will likely want to start your job search at translation and interpretation agencies. In addition, there will be plenty of freelance gigs. In-house translation-related positions are more rare, but if you are persistent you can land a position as a company’s designated translator.

Note that you should have at least JLPT N1 to be considered for most translation positions, and in addition to the JLPT N1 requirement, interpreting usually requires that you have some freelance experience.

2. Editing and Writing

Media companies or news outlets in Japan with non-Japanese audiences often looking for writers, editors, and those who can contribute high-quality content in their native language. These roles may also require a higher level of Japanese ability, such as JLPT N1 or N2, so that you can easily communicate with your Japanese team and clients.

Also, before you apply to your dream position in writing, journalism, or editing, it’s best to be proactive. Contact any media and …continue reading

    

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones.

You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

Full & Part-Time Warehouse/Agriculture Worker

  • Company: Creo Union Global Department Faros
  • Salary: ¥950 ~ ¥1,100 / Hour
  • Location: Hokkaido, Japan
  • English: Conversational
  • Japanese: Basic
  • Application: Overseas applications OK

Creo Union Global Department Faros is for warehouse and agriculture workers for a farm in Hokkaido.

Your main duty will be to gather, prepare and send off agricultural products.

Housing support is provided if requested.

Share this Job

Apply Here

Career Scout Japan

Recruiting Consultant

  • Company: Career Scout Japan
  • Salary: ¥3.6M ~ ¥10.0M / Year, Negotiable, Commission Based
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Fluent
  • Japanese: Conversational
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Career Scout Japan is seeking to recruit consultants with excellent communication and presentation skills to join its team.

Your main duties will be to develop and maintain existing clients, source/meet/evaluate potential candidates, and follow up with clients on the candidates’ introduction to facilitate their hiring process.

A 3-month full training is provided.

You must have a customer service-oriented mindset.

Share this Job

Apply Here

Berlitz Japan, Inc. (ベルリッツ・ジャパン株式会社)

English Instructors (Tokyo & Yokohama Areas)

  • Company: Berlitz Japan, Inc. (ベルリッツ・ジャパン株式会社)
  • Salary: ¥125,000 / Month
  • Location: Kanto, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Business level
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Berlitz is looking for English Instructors in the Tokyo and Yokohama area.

Any applicants who completed 12 years of education from countries with English as an official language are welcomed to apply.

Share this Job <div …continue reading

    

The business card in Japan is paramount to success in the workplace, even in an increasingly digital age with telework. If you’ve ever seen business cards being exchanged in a Japanese company before, you’re already aware of how much time and effort is put into exchanging these important cards. below to learn more about the business card in Japan, how to properly exchange cards, and other things to keep in mind.

Business card culture in Japan

Business cards are still a big deal in Japan and most people have their own business card, whether they are a company employee, a freelancer, or a business owner. With important information for communicating and doing business––e.g. someone’s name, association, and contact details, a business card is like a mini introduction to you. Therefore, it is the key to networking and the start of many relationships in Japan. Even with the prevalence of remote work, the business card is still exchanged online and offline, so it’s important to have a professional, high-quality card on-hand wherever you go.

The art of the business card exchange

The Japanese business card exchange is something that you may have seen in films or manga, or have even experienced yourself if you’ve worked at a company in Japan.

It may look effortless and flow perfectly, but there are actually a lot of different steps. If you have the opportunity to try it yourself, keep the following points in mind:

  • Before you go to your meeting, be sure to bring enough business cards so that you can exchange with as many people as are there. You should carry these business cards in a designated case and have easy access to it. Don’t just use your wallet!
  • You will usually exchange business cards right after you meet up with your client or contact for the first time, …continue reading
        

In March 2014, the former Prime Minister of Japan, Shinzo Abe, created a council for the promotion of female employment. Before that, in April 2013, his government had already passed a “Declaration of Action for a Society where Women Shine” and launched what was called the “Womenomics”. This program aimed to have 30% of women occupy positions of responsibility by 2020. However, on March 31, 2021, the World Economic Forum released its Global Gender Gap Report. Among the 156 countries that were analyzed, Japan was ranked 120, one position above the December 2019 report, but still far at the bottom of the rankings.

Employment vs Maternity

Even today, Japanese women seem to have to choose between employment and motherhood. In Japan, a woman who becomes a mother is unlikely to be promoted in the company as traditional company managers think that their mind is too focused on what happens at home.

The culture of long working hours, the traditional system of remuneration and promotion based on the worker’s seniority, the difficulty in accessing daycare centers in large cities and the lack of opportunities for women to resume their jobs after their maternity leave are just some of the obstacles that Japanese women must overcome if they want to pursue their professional careers.

Pressure and harassment at work towards working women who wish to have children is so common that there is a specific term for it: “matahara” (マタハラ). The results of a survey carried out by the Rengo trade union confederation on work and pregnancy in early 2015 indicated that one in five women had suffered some type of harassment in their workplace when they became pregnant. Among the 1,000 women who responded to the survey, 21% said they had received unfavorable treatment, while 10% said they had suffered verbal harassment. …continue reading

    

One of the less obvious challenges of living in Japan is the hot humid summer. True, the summer may be hotter in Australia, but the words “it’s the humidity that gets you” haven’t become cliché for no reason. If you’re about to experience your first Japanese summer, or just looking for some tips to make it easier this time around, you’ll be doing yourself a favor by reading this article before summer really hits!

Essential items for keeping cool

The most obvious thing about summer is the heat. Just like anywhere else in the world, the heat can become unbearable during the summer months. Where Japan takes this and manages to make it worse is with the humidity. In Tokyo, add in the mass of concrete, exhaust air conditioners, millions of people, lack of trees, and your left with an unpleasant recipe. Staying in the shade helps to be sure, but you cannot escape the humidity so easily. You will sweat. Therefore, the best thing to do is accept that and take measures to reduce how uncomfortable that makes you. No one likes a smelly person, so let’s take a look at a few ways to reduce the impact of this inevitable sweating problem.

The first best thing you can do is dress appropriately. In our modern age of mass production, cotton and polyesters have becoming dominate materials in clothing. However, these materials are not the best suited for sweat. Pick up a linen shirt, that’s リネン or 麻 in Japanese, and you will find yourself sweating less, and with much less smell. Alternative and somewhat counterintuitively, a thin wool shirt and or suit will be much more breathable than a cotton or cheap polyester suit, and keep you fresher longer, at least until 5 pm. An undershirt can also work wonders, such …continue reading