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There is a common misconception: Japan does not have sick pay and while many Japanese employers will allow you to believe this, the truth is a little more complicated.

Japan has a dedicated work culture. Employees often feel pressured to work, even if they are suffering or in pain. Unless you are on your deathbed, you are expected to work.

So, getting seriously sick in Japan can be especially stressful. But we encourage you to treat your health as a priority. Learn how to cover yourself if you get seriously ill while working in Japan.

Injury and Sickness Allowance

Injury and sickness allowance is called shoubyouteate (傷病手当(しょうびょうてあて)) in Japan. This is a financial fallback measure if you are too sick or injured to work. If you qualify, you can receive up to 60% of your monthly salary.

Short or long-term sickness

You should note that shoubyouteate is only for long-term sickness. You cannot receive allowance for any sicknesss or injury under 4 days. So, if you have a fleeting cold (or heavy hangover!), it is best to take any un-used annual leave to cover the loss.

Worker’s Accident Compensation Insurance

Had an accident at work? Injury and sickness allowance does not cover any workplace injuries. Instead, check to see if your work-related accident or illness comes under the Worker’s Accident Compensation Insurance umbrella.

Am I eligible for sick pay in Japan?

In order to qualify for shoubyouteate, you must meet a few conditions:

Unable to work for 4 days or more

Before you receive sick pay, you must first be absent for three continuous ‘waiting days’. You will not be paid any amount for these three days under shoubyouteate. Check with your employer if they offer any paid sick leave in their company policies. However, this is quite rare in Japanese companies.

You must be part …continue reading

    

If you’re looking for your next job in Japan, or just wanna keep your ear to the ground, our weekly Top Jobs section is something you’ll want to check.

Whether it’s in Education, IT and Software Engineering, or retail, or if you’re looking for jobs in Tokyo, Osaka or anywhere else in Japan, we’ll post some of the most interesting new jobs on the board right here. As always you can apply directly from the individual job page with your resume – simply make a profile on our site and start your job search.


Jobs in Kanto This Week (All Kanto)

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Jobs in Chubu This Week (All Chubu)

Find out more about this job HERE.

<img loading="lazy" src="https://jobsinjapan.com/wpdata/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/Screenshot-2022-07-14-112804-1024×312.jpg" alt="" width="600" …continue reading

    

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones.

You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

Idea Development

Business English Trainer

  • Company: Idea Development
  • Salary: ¥4,000 / Hour
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Idea Development is looking for Business English instructors to conduct business English classes in offices and deliver training programs for English, communication, meeting, negotiation, presentation, cross-culture and more.

You must be a native English speaker.

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Apply Here

Nihongo Center

Students Recruitment Staff

  • Company: Nihongo Center
  • Salary: ¥180,000 / Month + Achievement Salary (detailed below)
  • Location: Kyoto, Japan
  • English: Fluent
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

The Nihongo Center, a Japanese language school in Tokyo, is looking for student recruitment staff.

You will be in charge of recruiting students and promoting the school through social media, website content, and by contacting the overseas representative agents.

They currently have partners in Taiwan, Hongkong, Indonesia, Philippines, Australia, Turkey, Mexico and Vietnam.

You must be fluent in both English and Japanese.

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Apply Here

学校法人四恩学園ナザレ幼稚園

English teacher in Kindergarten

  • Company: 学校法人四恩学園ナザレ幼稚園
  • Salary: ¥270,000 / Month Negotiable
  • Location: Kanagawa, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Conversational
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

Nazareth Kindergarten, located in Yokohama, is looking for kindergarten English teachers to help with children’s education/childcare, shuttle bus attendance, parental support, cleaning, participation in Noh play and Japanese manners.

Benefits include an attractive salary and full social insurance coverage.

Share …continue reading

    

In Japan, as in most countries in the world, writing a good resume is an essential requirement for all job seekers. But what is the correct way to write a resume in Japanese? What sections does the Japanese curriculum include? How to write an attractive form to be hired in a Japanese company?

Here we will explain what you need to know in order to write a good CV in Japanese.

Get a resume sample

Resume forms or rirekisho (履歴書(りれきしょ)) in Japan are easily found on the internet, both to download and print. You can also find them in convenience stores or in job offer magazines. They are brightly colored magazines with the letters “Town Work”. If you pick up one of these magazines and you do not know Japanese, you will probably put them back in their place, since they are totally in Japanese. But avoid doing that, because in the last pages there is usually one or two blank resumes. Therefore, you can get your first CVs without having to buy them and, at least, they can be used to practice. Try to get several models. Keep in mind that in Japan resumes are written by hand and are rarely scanned or emailed. Even though there may be small differences between CV models depending on the area of the country, or even depending on the positions you are applying for, most versions are accepted by all Japanese companies.

Writing a Flawless Japanese CV

First, do not get discouraged if you make a mistake, but if you do it is best to start over. It is not recommended that you try to correct a typo on your resume by crossing out the wrong words, download multiple copies of the sample resume instead.

Afterwards, a good photo is worth a thousand words. Realistically, when …continue reading

    

Getting a job anywhere can be difficult but it can be even more challenging to get a job in a foreign country and in a foreign language. To do well in the job hunting process you have to prepare properly and follow the Japanese style of job hunting, which is a little different from what you might be used to.

What if I’m not a new graduate?

Japan has a long tradition of hiring new graduates who, in times past, would be expected to dedicate most or even all of their working life to a company, and in return that company had very strict rules on firing to make sure employees were protected. This is changing in Japan and the “job for life” is looking like a thing of the past for younger generations.

These days more and more Japanese are changing jobs mid-career and companies are looking for talent beyond the annual hiring of new graduates in April every year. Year round recruiting for key positions has become the norm. As a foreigner in Japan you can take advantage of many skills gaps in both early and mid-career positions, especially if you can speak Japanese to a business fluent level (though often this is not required). There is a massive skills gap in Japan, especially in the tech sector, and many companies desperately scramble to hire coders and engineers from overseas to fill this gap. This could be you, but there are a few important things you need to know to have a chance at getting some of these positions. The first hurdle: your resume.

How is a Japanese Rirekisho different from a Resume?

Japanese have a very specific style of resume called a rirekisho 履歴書. It covers your education, experience, and certifications and has a specific format, along with some useful info …continue reading

    

Up until recently, many Japanese companies offered lifetime employment. In return, employees gave their dedicated loyalty to their company. But now things are changing. More and more employees in Japan are switching companies, industries and even careers.

Are you thinking about finding a new job in Japan? Learn how to ensure a smooth transition, from job search to your last day.

How long does it take to get a new job in Japan?

The length of time it takes to change jobs can vary depending on the industry. For example, service industry jobs may only take 1 – 3 weeks. But management positions may take up to 3- 6 months!

The time to change jobs may be shorter depending on seasonality. For instance, there is a huge influx of available ALT jobs in Japan from January to March. This is when schools rush to hire teachers for the new school year. However, the number of available positions greatly reduces after the spring terms starts.

As a rough guide, please see an example timeline below:

  • Week 1 – Start to think about your career options. Do you want to stay in the same kind of position or try a whole different industry? Prepare your CV / resume to ensure it is up to date with your most recent qualifications and experience.
  • Week 2 – Begin meeting with recruiters. There are a few international recruitment companies who specialize in finding jobs in Japan for foreigners. Talk to them about your goals. They will begin looking for job opportunities for you based on your work experience and Japanese language ability. You can find these recruiters on job search websites (such as Jobs In Japan!).
  • Week 3 – 4 – It can take a while for interviews to be scheduled. Use this time to become an expert …continue reading
        

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones.

You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

Embassy of the United Arab Emirates

Arabic/Japanese/English Interpreter Translator

  • Company: Embassy of the United Arab Emirates
  • Salary: ¥590,000 ~ ¥700,000 / Month (Negotiable)
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Fluent
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

The Embassy of the United Arab Emirates is seeking a new interpreter and translator.

Your main duty will include translating, editing and revising letters, reports, documents, texts, news articles, studies and presentations from English and Japanese into Arabic and vice versa.

Fluency in English, Arabic and Japanese is preferred.

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Apply Here

Abracadabra

Japanese to English Translator/Editor

  • Company: Abracadabra
  • Salary: ¥250,000 ~ ¥350,000 / Month (Negotiable)
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

As a Japanese to English translator/editor, your duty will include proofreading localization of Japanese websites, social media and smartphone apps and copywriting for different IT-related products.

You must have at least two years of experience in a similar role.

Share this Job

Apply Here

CardealPage

Overseas Sales Staff

  • Company: CardealPage
  • Salary: ¥240,000 ~ ¥500,000 / Month (Negotiable)
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

CardealPage is looking for an overseas sales staff to sell used cars to overseas clients.

Additional language abilities such as Portuguese, French and Swahili are preferred.

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<a target=_blank oo-button="primary outline" href="https://jobs.gaijinpot.com/job/view/lang/en/job_id/142166?utm_source=blog.gaijinpot.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=job" itemprop="url" …continue reading

    

For many native or near-native English speakers, working as an assistant language teacher (ALT) is one of the most popular ways to get a taste of life in Japan. Positions are available across the country, numerous companies can sponsor visas, and generally no Japanese ability is required. However, before booking a flight or moving homes, it’s necessary to dazzle at the all-important interview. If you’re looking to move to Japan or simply change employers, use these 5 tips to increase your chances of getting hired for an ALT position.

1. Dress Professionally

Or, put another way, be sure to follow the Japanese office dress-code. While many offices outside of Japan may be flexible and provide more opportunities for self-expression through fashion choices, Japanese work environments prefer a more standardized approach:

Men are expected to show up to interviews, in person or online, in a pressed and fitted suit with a neutral patterned tie. Facial hair can be considered unprofessional in Japan, but should be acceptable as long as it is closely trimmed with clear boundaries. Be aware that long hair on men is rarely acceptable, with some companies offering a position contingent on agreeing to a shorter hair style.

Women should wear a neutral colored blazer, skirt, and pressed dress shirt. Dyed hair is acceptable for anyone as long as it is a natural shade. Additionally, tattoos should be fully covered, jewelry kept to a bare minimum, and strong perfume or cologne should be avoided. By following the standard dress-code prior to being briefed will indicate to the company that the applicant can easily blend into a Japanese work environment.

2. Listen Well

If you’ve made it to the interview stage, it is likely that your chances of being accepted into the company are good. This means that the school has almost enough information …continue reading

    

Source: Gaijin Pot

If you’re looking to work in Japan, check back here each week as we look through our database of top jobs in Japan posted to GaijinPot and showcase some of the most interesting ones.

You can apply directly to these companies by creating a profile on GaijinPot Jobs!

Embassy of the United Arab Emirates

Arabic/Japanese/English Interpreter Translator

  • Company: Embassy of the United Arab Emirates
  • Salary: ¥590,000 ~ ¥700,000 / Month Negotiable
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Fluent
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

The embassy of United Arab Emirates is seeking a new interpreter and translator.

Your main duty will include translate, edit and revise letters, reports, documents, texts, news articles, studies and presentations from English and Japanese language into Arabic and vice versa.

Fluency in English, Arabic and Japanese is preferred.

Share this Job

Apply Here

Abracadabra

Japanese to English Translator/Editor

  • Company: Abracadabra
  • Salary: ¥250,000 ~ ¥350,000 / Month Negotiable
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Native level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

As a Japanese to English translator/editor your duty will include proofreading localization of Japanese websites, social media and smartphone apps, and copywriting for different IT-related products.

You must have at least two years in a similar role.

Share this Job

Apply Here

CardealPage

Overseas Sales Staff

  • Company: CardealPage
  • Salary: ¥240,000 ~ ¥500,000 / Month Negotiable
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • English: Business level
  • Japanese: Fluent
  • Application: Must currently reside in Japan

CardealPage is looking for an overseas sales staff to sell used cars to overseas clients.

Additional language abilities such as Portuguese, French and Swahili are preferred.

Share this Job

Apply …continue reading

    

Working in Japan can be a new and exciting experience. But adjusting to a different country’s work style can also be a challenge! You may face difficulties you have never encountered in your previous country. Why does my co-worker never talk to me? Did I do something wrong? Why are my ideas being ignored?

Here we discuss some common issues you may face with Japanese co-workers and how you can resolve them!

Common problems with foreign workers

You may have noticed that some of your bosses or co-workers seem to resent working with international people. A recent study by employment agency, Persol Group, highlighted the top complaints Japanese mangers have with foreign workers:

  • Foreign workers are too assertive
  • They demand salary raises
  • They have little loyalty to the company
  • The learning curve for their position is long and slow

Communication barriers

If you came to Japan to improve your language skill, you may be keen to practice with your co-workers. But bear in mind even if you are an advanced learner, things may still be lost in translation.

If your co-workers are English speakers, try double-checking in both Japanese and English to ensure understanding. If you are doubtful that the message is coming across, take the time to be very, very clear. Mistakes are forgiven in Japanese companies, but it will take a while before they fully trust you again.

However, that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t try to talk in Japanese! Many Japanese people are nervous about speaking in English. They are afraid of making mistakes and embarrassing themselves. But, if you demonstrate that you are willing to make errors in Japanese, they will be more comfortable talking to you in English. Even if you are not an advanced speaker, your Japanese coworkers will appreciate your effort.

Cultural miscommunication

Japanese workers prefer to avoid conflict. That’s why Japanese people …continue reading