Another women’s university in Japan to accept transgender women, the first in Kyushu
soranews24.com -- Apr 12
As a country that still stands behind fairly rigid gender roles, Japan has a long way to go in granting its LGBTQ citizens equal rights. Same-sex couples, for example, are still fighting for their right to get married in Japan, and many in the LGBTQ community experience discrimination and exclusion from society on a daily basis.

Yet in spite of this, every once in a while small strides are made towards equal rights. Transgender women, at least, are slowly gaining acceptance by Japanese society. Last year, Ochanomizu University, a women’s college in Tokyo, announced that they will start accepting transgender women to their programs starting in 2020. A few other women’s universities have done the same, including Nara Women’s University, and Tsuda University, a private women’s college in Tokyo.

Now Chikushi Jogakuen University, a women’s university in Fukuoka, is also adding its name to the list. They announced their decision on the fourth, and said that they intend to outline the details by the end of 2019. They would be the first women’s university in Kyushu to take the path of acceptance.

On a governmental level, equal rights are still a long way off, but little moves like this on the societal level really help make strides towards acceptance of LGBTQ individuals. As same-sex romance is being portrayed more and more in the media, and positive LGBTQ shows like Queer Eye are becoming popular in Japan, awareness of LGBTQ issues are coming into the spotlight.

That leads to minor but important changes, like transgender women being accepted into women’s universities, and gender becoming irrelevant on high school applications. Perhaps, step-by-step, little by little, Japan can carve its way towards a more equal society.

News source: soranews24.com
Jul 17
School-related matters led to more suicides last year among youth aged between 10 and 19 than any other issue, the government said Tuesday in its annual paper on the topic. (Japan Times)
Jul 15
Japan's Princess Mako has visited the ancient Inca city of Machu Picchu in Peru and a village that once had a Japanese immigrant as its chief. (NHK)
Jul 11
The population of Japanese nationals has fallen for the 10th straight year, while the ratio of foreign residents topped 2 percent for the first time. (NHK)
Jul 10
Princess Mako left Japan on Tuesday for Peru and Bolivia, where she will attend ceremonies marking the 120th anniversary of the arrival of the first Japanese immigrants. It is the first time for the princess to visit the two South American countries. (NHK)
Jul 09
Miyagi Prefectural Police have arrested a 30-year-old male middle school teacher over the alleged possession of marijuana in Sendai City, reports the Sankei Shimbun (July 7). (tokyoreporter.com)
Jul 08
A log boat set off from Taiwan on Sunday on a journey of more than 200 kilometers to Yonaguni Island in Okinawa Prefecture, southern Japan. (NHK)
Jul 07
A male junior high school student died Saturday after being stabbed the previous day by a fellow student in Tokorozawa, Saitama Prefecture, according to police. (Japan Today)
Jul 03
The Japanese operator of TOEIC said Tuesday it will not provide its English proficiency test as part of the country's standardized university entrance exam system due to start next April, because the process is too complicated. (Japan Today)
Jul 01
A new Japanese law took effect on Monday to prevent the spread of passive smoke, and bans indoor smoking in public spaces. (NHK)
Jul 01
With Japan’s revised health promotion law, which includes enhanced measures against secondhand smoke, set to partially take effect at the beginning of July, universities across the country are divided over rules governing smoking. (Japan Times)