Japan bans indoor smoking in public spaces
NHK -- Jul 01
A new Japanese law took effect on Monday to prevent the spread of passive smoke, and bans indoor smoking in public spaces.

The revised health promotion law is aimed at reducing the health risks posed by the inhalation of second-hand smoke.

The prohibited spaces include schools, hospitals and offices of the central and local governments. The law allows such entities to set up outdoor smoking areas on their premises, and post signs indicating where smoking is allowed.

Managers of such facilities will face fines up to the equivalent of about 4,600 dollars if they fail to fully comply with the new rules.

People will be fined up to 2,700 dollars if they smoke in prohibited areas, and ignore warnings from those in charge of the facilities.

Smoking will be prohibited at eating establishments and corporations starting from April 1 next year.

News source: NHK
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