Car services co. accused of faking paperwork for vehicles for drift racing
tokyoreporter.com -- Sep 11
Tokyo Metropolitan Police have arrested an executive of an automobile services company for allegedly fabricating paperwork for vehicles used in drift racing, reports NHK (Sept. 10).

In January, Takayuki Kikuchi collected 20,000 yen from each of Keigo Asakura, 26, and four other drivers for approving their vehicles for an inspection in spite of the fact that they had been unlawfully modified.

In a clip provided by the network, silver and white sedans are shown weaving through lanes of traffic at high speeds on an expressway. During turns, the rear wheels of the vehicles skid, making them appear to “drift.”

Persons authorized to conduct such inspections are considered to be nearly government officials, which makes such payments a form of bribery.

During questioning, Kikuchi admitted to the allegations, telling police he began accepting money to ensure vehicles passed the inspections about five years ago.

The other five suspects also admit to the allegations. “To modify the vehicle such that it will pass requires a large amount of money,” Asakura was quoted.

News source: tokyoreporter.com
Dec 11
Japanese scientist Akira Yoshino accepted the Nobel Prize in chemistry on Tuesday at a ceremony in Sweden for his contribution to the development of lithium-ion batteries. (Japan Times)
Dec 11
A former Japanese defense chief has been shot in the leg near his home in Morioka, Iwate Prefecture, Sankei newspaper reported on Tuesday citing police sources. (Japan Today)
Dec 11
Russia may be banned from the next two Olympics but the door is open for Russian participation at the 2020 Tokyo Summer Games if athletes can meet the rigid criteria laid out by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). (Japan Today)
Dec 11
Police referred a 17-year-old high school student and two men to prosecutors on Tuesday over their alleged involvement in the online trading of uranium in violation of Japanese law regulating nuclear materials. (Japan Today)
Dec 10
It might be the most Japanese of political scandals: a furor over Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's guest list at a party to mark the annual cherry blossom season. (Japan Today)
Dec 10
Afghan police said Monday they have detained a total of six men in connection with the shooting death last week of a Japanese doctor who was a well-known aid worker in the central Asian country. (Japan Today)
Dec 10
In Japan these days it seems that conservatives want to change things and progressives want to cling to the status quo. An apparently minor, but highly symbolic, example is Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's government's proposal to change the order of Japanese names when written in the Latin or Western alphabet. (Nikkei)
Dec 10
Empress Masako said Monday she is happy to have completed her duties as part of Emperor Naruhito’s enthronement rituals, and pledged to continue such work and help her husband more for the happiness of the people. (Japan Times)
Dec 09
Japanese scientist Akira Yoshino delivered his Nobel lecture on Sunday in Sweden. Yoshino is one of the three winners of this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry. (NHK)
Dec 07
In a major privacy breach, 18 hard drives used by the Kanagawa Prefectural Government to store taxpayers’ data were auctioned online over the summer instead of being destroyed, prefectural officials disclosed Friday. (Japan Times)