Controversial art exhibition featuring 'comfort woman' statue reopens in Nagoya
Japan Times -- Oct 09
An art exhibition that sparked controversy for featuring a statue symbolizing “comfort women” reopened Tuesday in Nagoya, with organizers placing tighter security and limiting the number of visitors after it was abruptly closed two months ago following threats.

The statue, sculpted by a South Korean husband-and-wife team, and other works that had been on display at the exhibition — titled “After ‘Freedom of Expression?'” — before the shutdown will continue to be shown until the art festival ends on Oct. 14.

The exhibition at the Aichi Triennale 2019 was canceled three days after its Aug. 1 opening, with organizers citing security reasons after receiving numerous complaints and threats.

It showcased art works previously not shown due to what critics call censorship, including a piece on Japan’s imperial system, besides the statue symbolizing comfort women.

The term “comfort women” is a euphemism used to refer to women who provided sex, including those who did so against their will, for Japanese troops before and during World War II.

Critics and many artists have argued that the shutdown was an act of censorship, rather than one of safety.

The tighter security measures introduced Tuesday include baggage inspections using metal detectors.

News source: Japan Times
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