Business | 3

Omron Corporation, a major electronics manufacturer headquartered in Kyoto, has announced plans to cut about 2,000 jobs both domestically and internationally in response to deteriorating performance due to China's economic slowdown. In Japan, the company aims to solicit voluntary retirements for approximately 1,000 employees, which accounts for about 10% of its workforce.

A renowned manufacturer of scarves, highly acclaimed domestically and internationally, has decided to close its doors. Scarves with vertical stripes and bold colors are its hallmark. It even topped sales for five consecutive years at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

As part of the "Creating the Future from Here" project, TV Asahi is presenting SDGs initiatives on climate change. The theme for Monday's show is "Both Enjoyable Work and Economic Growth," covering an apple orchard that is challenging the future of agriculture with its innovative cultivation method.

Daihatsu Motor Co. has resumed production of ten vehicle models, including its mainstay mini vehicles, at its factory in Oita Prefecture, which had been halted due to an issue with improper certification acquisition. However, the scale of the production resumption, including models for which a plan has been established, remains limited to 40% of Daihatsu's total domestic production, raising concerns about the prolonged impact on suppliers and related businesses.

Taiwanese semiconductor manufacturing giant TSMC's first factory in Japan is set to open today, February 24, in Kumamoto Prefecture.

As the Nikkei reaches historic highs, investors are reminiscent of the last time the market reached such dizzy heights in 1989, the end of an era as Heisei began, marked by the emergence of the Recruit scandal, considered the largest corruption scandal in the post-war era, leading to the formation of a new government led by Prime Minister Takeshita.

Online retail giant Amazon has announced that it will raise the threshold for free shipping on standard deliveries in Japan.

On the 22nd of this month, the Nikkei Stock Average reached a new all-time high, surpassing the peak of the bubble period in 1989. While some view this as a sign of optimism towards Japanese companies, others point out that it does not reflect the actual state of the economy. The focus now is on whether stock prices will continue to rise and whether companies can achieve growth that justifies their stock valuations.